Jack and the Beanstalk Craft – Make Your Own Giant Beanstalk!

Jack and the Beanstalk Craft – A giant construction paper beanstalk hangs from the ceiling tiles making for a whole-class creation that adds a touch of magic to the room!

Jack And The Beanstalk Collaborative Class Project Image

After it’s put together, kids can have fun re-telling the story of Jack And The Beanstalk using character puppets made out of construction paper and popsicle sticks!

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Directions

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1. Start out with a piece of large green construction paper.

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2. Use a green marker to draw a spiral outward, starting in the center of the construction paper.

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3. Cut around the spiral shape and cut off the edges of the paper. Make a crevice where the kids will begin cutting into the spiral.

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4. Pour a tiny bit of glue over the paper and sprinkle it with some glitter for extra magical effect! Leave overnight to dry.

5. Cut out leaves, beans, and sprigs. Make curly sprigs by cutting thin strips of green construction paper. Wrap them around a pencil, slightly unrolling afterward.

6. Create leaves by cutting football shapes out of the green construction paper. Curl these around a pencil slightly. Beans are just slightly elongated football shapes.

7. The kids can also cut out their own leaves too but you can lay some precut leaves out on the tables for inspiration.

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8. Kids begin by cutting along the spiral until they have a long curvey beanstalk.

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9. Next, glue on some paper leaves, beans, and curly sprigs!

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10. Hole punch the end of each beanstalk and tie a small loop of yarn to the end of each one.  String a longer piece of yarn through the yarn loops on the individual beanstalks and attach the whole thing to the ceiling tiles by this string.

Now all you need are some kindergarten-made character puppets and kids can use their imaginations to re-enact the story of Jack And The Beanstalk!

Jack and the Beanstalk Craft – Make Your Own Giant Beanstalk!WP_20150603_14_51_16_ProWP_20150603_14_52_18_Pro

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The Farmer in the Dell

farmer in the dell imageToday’s featured song is The Farmer in the Dell.

 

The Farmer in the Dell Lyrics

The farmer in the dell

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The farmer in the dell!

 

The farmer takes a wife

The farmer takes a wife

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The farmer takes a wife!

 

The wife takes a child

The wife takes a child

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The wife takes a child!

 

The child takes a nurse

The child takes a nurse

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The child takes a nurse!

 

The nurse takes a cow

The nurse takes a cow

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The nurse takes a cow!

 

The cow takes a dog

The cow takes a dog

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The cow takes a dog!

 

The dog takes a cat

The dog takes a cat

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The dog takes a cat!

 

The cat takes a rat

The cat takes a rat

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The cat takes a rat!

 

The rat takes the cheese

The rat takes the cheese

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The rat takes the cheese!

 

The cheese stands alone

The cheese stands alone

High-ho! the dairy-oh!

The cheese stands alone!

 

Farmer in the Dell Music Video on Youtube

 

 

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All About Animal Tracks

My kids had sooo much fun making animal tracks with toy animals and play-doh, and learning all about animal tracks! Did you know that cat tracks look like those of an animal that walks on two feet?  It is because they step with their front paws in exactly the same place as with their back paws!

Here is my lesson plan,  All About Animal Tracks.

Objectives: Students will identify patterns based on representations of objects in the sky. Vocab: Crescent Moon, Full Moon, New Moon (Colorado PreK Standard: Science and Knowledge Skills 2.4)

Subject: Science

Animal Tracks Activity

Source: ModernParentsMessykids.com

Materials: Book: Big Tracks, Little Tracks: Following Animal Prints by Millicent E Sesam and Marlene Hill Donnellyplastic animals in crates,  play-doh (or clay), pencils,  science journals or paper to record observations

Procedure:  Read Book:  Big Tracks, Little Tracks: Following Animal Prints

Say, “Today we will explore the tracks different animals make.  We will use the animals in the bins to walk on the play dough.  Then we will see how the animal tracks look different from each other.  We can write about our observations in our science journals. “

Students work with the different animals, pressing their feet into the play-doh to create tracks.  They write their observations in their science journal.  You can have them draw a picture of the animal on on side of the paper, and the tracks that animal makes on the other side.  They can try to spell out the name of the animal too.

Assessment:  Objectives will be met when students are able to identify that different animals make different tracks.

Large Motor Connection Activity: Scavenger Hunt – Look for animal tracks outside in the snow and mud.  Go on a walk and look to animal tracks, students guess what kind of animal made the tracks.  

Sources:

ModernParentsMessykids.com – Animal Activities

BookBig Tracks, Little Tracks: Following Animal Prints

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Making Patterns With Vegetables – PreK Lesson

Veggie Prints

Source: MeriCherry.com

In this activity, students dip pieces of vegetables into paint and stamp onto paper to create patterns. Students will practice making patterns, learn about the vegetables we eat and get a glimpse of how vegetables grow.

Objectives

Students will create patterns through the repetition of a unit (Colorado Standard, Math Knowledge And Skills 4.3)

Materials

Preparation

First tape some chart paper to the tables. I like to completely cover the tables and tape the edges of the paper to the underside of the table to give the kids lots of room to stamp.

Cut the vegetables you will be using as stamps. If you are feeling creative you can carve into the vegetables to make different shapes.  

Now grab your book and gather the children..

Procedure:  

Ask questions such as, “What is a vegetable” (carrots, tomatoes, bell peppers) and “Where are vegetables grown?” (gardens, farms, etc) to assess students prior understanding.

Say, ” Today we will talk about some of the vegetables we eat and make patterns with real vegetables!”

Read the book, The Vegetables We Eat by Gail Gibbons

Now pull out the magic vegetable basket Talk about each vegetable as you pull it out. how some of the real cut vegetables and have kids guess talk about what kind of vegetable it is. You can even let students taste some of the raw carrots. Talk about the color of the vegetable and what it looks like. Have students describe the vegetables.

Say, “Today we will use the vegetables to make patterns.”

Model stamping a vegetable to make an AB/ABC/ABCD/ABCB pattern.

Students go to tables and stamp the vegetables in paint and them on the chart paper to create patterns.

Assessment:  The standards will have been met when students are able create a pattern using the vegetable stamps and paint

Large Motor Connection Activity: Vegetable Color Toss Game – Bean Bags  Students pick a colored bean bag.  Then say a vegetable that is the same color.  Then they try to toss the bean bag into a container set out a little ways in front of them.

Sources

Veggie Print Making by Meri Cherry

 

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